Vo Trong Nghia Architects’ Low-cost Housing Moves Towards Mass Production

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Chicago Architecture Biennial 2015: Vietnam-based Vo Trong Nghia Architects has unveiled a fourth prototype of its low-cost housing layout, which is now moving in the direction of mass manufacturing .

Vo Trong Nghia Architects' low-cost housing for Chicago Architecture Biennial 2015

The S Property – a undertaking that has been ongoing since it was very first unveiled in 2012 – was created by Vo Trong Nghia’s studio in response to Vietnam’s housing crisis. The aim was for a straightforward dwelling that can be created for under \$four,000 (£2,600).

The team has now refined the layout to make it suitable for mass production, which they think will enable it to be used widely to deal with housing shortages across Vietnam, as well as to provide relief in countries struck by organic disasters.

Vo Trong Nghia Architects' low-cost housing for Chicago Architecture Biennial 2015

The fourth prototype is on present at the Chicago Architecture Biennial, which opened 3 October 2015 and continues to 3 January 2016.


Connected story: Vo Trong Nghia’s latest minimal-expense home is “secure adequate to stand up to normal disasters”


It functions a galvanised steel construction, which is industrially developed to guarantee sturdiness and regularity.

Vo Trong Nghia Architects' low-cost housing for Chicago Architecture Biennial 2015

Each element weighs much less than 130 lbs (60 kilograms) for ease of transport and assembly, and the frame can be erected in beneath three hours. The dimensions of the elements have been also designed with the measurements of shipping containers in thoughts to ease international transport and deployment.

Vo Trong Nghia Architects' low-cost housing for Chicago Architecture Biennial 2015

This prototype is sheathed in dried leaves, but the house can be clad in any nearby materials or industrially created surface, based on what is locally accessible.

It is one of 4 complete-sized houses on demonstrate at the biennial, along with a idea for Mexico housing by Tatiana Bilbao, a modular residence by SelgasCano and a light-filled timber property by MOS Architects.

Vo Trong Nghia Architects' low-cost housing for Chicago Architecture Biennial 2015

S House was first designed with Vietnam’s Mekong Delta in mind. The original prototype had a light-weight steel structure, while the second was framed by precast concrete, expected to offer you better long-phrase stability.


Related story: Eight resourceful lower-value housing projects from about the globe


The most current prototype, exposed at the end of 2014, combines the two – it has both a steel frame with a concrete foundation and steel lattice walls. This will enable it to stand up to typhoons and earthquakes, stated the company.

dezeen_Low Cost House by Vo Trong NghiaVo Trong Nghia’s authentic S House prototype had a light-weight steel framework

“Starting from the Mekong Delta, the S Home venture is aiming to increase itself to the total Vietnam, Southeast Asia, and to the rest of world – India and African countries – where low-revenue individuals are suffering from poorly developed atmosphere,” the studio previously advised Dezeen.

S House by Vo Trong NghiaVo Trong Nghia’s second S Residence prototype was framed by precast concrete, which presented higher stability

“Though there are several neighborhood issues this kind of as weak ground problem, regular typhoons and likely earthquakes, the construction is secure adequate to stand up to all-natural disasters,” they explained.

S Houses are designed to be versatile and adaptable to expansion as families develop or new utilizes are extra. The simple concept could also be employed to generate schools or local community centres, explained the company.

S House by Vo Trong NghiaVo Trong Nghia’s third prototype for S Home has both a steel frame with a concrete foundation and steel lattice walls

Vo Trong Nghia Architects has produced a status for its pioneering use of bamboo, as well as for its aims to create a new sustainable method to architecture. Recent projects include a restaurant made of bamboo, a knot-shaped college with rooftop gardens, and a series of linked towers with bamboo planters in the facades.

Dezeen

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