Layers Of Brick, Concrete And Glass Define Private Spaces In A Thai Home

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A pair of red brick walls display the back of this house on the Gulf of Thailand, which faces away from a seaside resort and towards a cemetery where the client’s father is buried (+ slideshow).

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn and Naweepahb

The client asked Bangkok-primarily based architects Adisorn Srisaowanunt and Naweepahb Taksayos to layout a small, secluded property as a retreat from her long working days in nearby Hua Hin, a occupied resort town.

The architects named the project The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea right after this notion.

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb T

The house contains a succession of open, semi-enclosed and entirely enclosed spaces that at some point lead onto an exposed hillside.

Materials with varying levels of opacity – ranging from red brick to concrete, and glass and steel – were utilised to emphasise the different degrees of enclosure.

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb T

Courtyards and terraces hidden behind the brick outer walls supply secluded spots for reading through or entertaining guests, even though the client’s personal living regions are fully glazed.

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb T

“The transition from the internal to the external can be perceived as sequence of enclosures,” explained the architects.


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“The use of diverse resources generates different densities of enclosed space,” they explained, “the external wall is manufactured out of brick, whilst the interior is framed with a concrete structure, ahead of shifting to glass and steel when it passes into the personal spaces at the back of the residence to allow for an open see to the landscape.”

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb T

A flat roof overhangs the glazed portion of the property, the place a deck extends from the client’s bedroom in the direction of the lakeside cemetery. Bamboo plants and trees surrounding the house and terrace offer extra shade.

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb T

“At this spot a see of the city of Hua Hin can be observed by seeking in direction of the sea to the east,” said the architects. “On the opposite side of the lake from the cemetery is a small curved road that passes from north to south. Both sides of the street are descendants’ land, which is equally divided into plots.”

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb T

“The plotted land portrays the family’s belonging to the surrounding, which has the cemetery as the centre of the owner’s inner globe. In contrast, Hua Hin can be witnessed to represent the owner’s outer globe,” they added. “This architecture is produced to be a bodily representation of the concept of inner and outer planet views.”

The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb TSite plan – click for more substantial image The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb TGround floor program – click for more substantial image The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb T1st floor strategy – click for larger image The House on the Hill That Turns its Back to the Sea by Adisorn S and Naweepahb TSegment – click for more substantial image


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