This housing venture in Brussels was funded and developed by its residents, to a style by neighborhood studio Stekke + Fraas based mostly on the rules of “durability, prosperity, ecology and social diversity” .

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

Named Brutopia, the task is located in the city’s Forest neighbourhood, near to the Wiels modern arts centre.

Its inhabitants needed to get pleasure from the benefits of living in the city but without having paying more than the odds, so they clubbed with each other to type a non-profit organisation to manage the project’s price range and construction.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

Stekke + Fraas was asked to oversee the style of the complicated, which is divided into two blocks containing a complete of 29 apartments, as properly as units for businesses and a community centre for local elderly individuals.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

“The project was initiated by 15 individuals who all knew every other and all had the same need,” architect Serge Fraas informed Dezeen.

“They needed an affordable but substantial-top quality dwelling in Brussels that has some architectural qualities and is ecologically progressive.”

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

Organising themselves into operating groups based mostly on their person expertise, the collective was ready to deal with the various tasks usually handled by a developer, which includes finances, subsidies, development and the demands of the local community.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

In accordance to Fraas, the principal variation between this venture and the clients he usually functions for was the require for strong communication with the entire group.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

“In a classical romantic relationship with a developer there is only one professional interlocutor,” Fraas pointed out.

“But in the case of Brutopia the communication procedure was a lot more crucial and necessary distinct kinds of data transfer, both with individuals and the standard assembly.”

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

The plot for the constructing was selected due to the fact of its backlinks to public transport. It includes area for bicycle storage, helping to attain the wanted sustainability criteria.


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Only two of the 29 apartments will not achieve Passivhaus standing – which is granted to buildings that use organic approaches to supply heating and cooling.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

The two buildings are positioned on either side of a communal garden, with shared facilities including the laundry area and a multifunctional space improving the options for interaction – a important factor of the short.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

Inhabitants of all ages, backgrounds and occupations contribute to the project’s social diversity, which is supported by the inclusion of company spaces that ensure greater interaction with the neighborhood local community.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

Apartments of various sizes are accommodated inside of the project’s programme. The various value factors were intended to entice occupants from a broad cross-area of society.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

The buildings have been also made in accordance with the varying demands of its future inhabitants, as set out in the early meetings. Loads of light, open floor plans and simplicity were amongst the qualities the architects were asked to focus on.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

A pragmatic strategy to components led to the external surfaces being clad in panels of recyclable aluminium with good light-reflecting properties.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

Most of the apartments had been handed over to the occupants as empty shells that could be configured and decorated as necessary. A assortment have been then fitted with plywood partitions and furniture that continues the affordable strategy.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architects

The complex’s identify, Brutopia, combines the words “Brussels” and “Utopia”, but Fraas explained this title now feels outdated.

“‘Utopia’ was picked at the starting, when the project even now appeared an utopian idea,” Fraas said. “Today it looks more suitable to identify it ‘Brupossible’.”

Photography is by Tim Van de Velde.

Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architectsGround floor program Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architectsInitial floor program Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architectsSecond floor prepare Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architectsThird floor strategy Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architectsFourth floor prepare Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architectsFifth floor prepare Brutopia by Stekke+Fraas architectsSection Dezeen

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