Atelier Tekuto Completes Crystalline Concrete Home For Two Chemists

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Volcanic ash is mixed into the concrete shell of this angular property in central Tokyo, which was made by Atelier Tekuto for a pair of chemists (+ slideshow).

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

The Japanese firm developed a sort of “environmentally friendly” concrete for R Torso C, which employs particles of volcanic ash known as shirasu in place of conventional sand aggregate.

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

The ash increases the power and durability of the concrete, as well as helping to offer humidity control, explained the architects. Aray Architecture also used shirasu bricks to aid thermally insulate a house in south-west Japan.

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

The raw concrete structure is left exposed across exterior and interior, in which it is paired with a mixture of dark and light timber fittings.


Related story: Atelier Tekuto produces an angular house with a pattern of pointy skylights


“We want to see exposed concrete finish within and out,” the clientele advised Atelier Tekuto, “a difficult piece of architecture that is at the very same time environmentally pleasant.”

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

The corners of the residence were “pruned” away to produce windows with views of the sky and street from the narrow urban plot. This attribute also crops up in the firm’s Monoclinic Home, which has pointy skylights and exposed concrete walls.

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

“The way of creating architecture respectfully in the direction of nature and the setting in substantial density residential districts in Tokyo is to develop in the direction of the sky,” stated the architects. “It is the only route with a real feeling of the vastness of nature.”

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

“To type a sturdy connection with the sky, the corners of the rectangular creating had been pruned away at an angle,” they additional. “This action, cutting away the internal volume, paradoxically generates a sense of spaciousness in the steady four-storey-area within.”

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

The windows are aligned to enable normal light into every single of the building’s 4 storeys. The ground floor is somewhat elevated to let a portion of glazing to extend down to the sound-insulated basement, which is employed as a music room and for viewing movies.

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

A flight of concrete methods leads up the front of the house to the entrance level, exactly where there is a classic Japanese area and a bathroom.

A small open-plan living space and kitchen sit on the first floor, even though the bedroom is positioned on the third. Storage regions are constructed into furniture in the residing spot to support combat the lack of area.

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto

“The residing area is a quite little space, but a 5-metre-high ceiling and a large oblique triangular window drawing in an abundance of external light final results in a cognition that is far greater than the actuality,” said the architects.

Photography is by Jérémie Souteyrat.

R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto Basement program – click for more substantial picture R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto Ground floor program – click for bigger image R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto First floor plan – click for greater picture R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto Second floor prepare – click for bigger picture R · torso · C house in Tokyo by Atelier Tekuto Area – click for bigger image


Associated story: Tokyo residence by Atelier Tekuto with skylight made to “frame the sky”

Tokyo house by Atelier Tekuto with&ltbr /&gt skylight designed to &quotframe the sky&quot

This Tokyo property by Japanese office Atelier Tekuto attributes a huge triangular window that angles up above the rooftops of surrounding homes to deliver daylight in from above (+ slideshow). A lot more »

Relevant movie: Optical Glass Property by Hiroshi Nakamura &amp NAP encloses a tree-filled courtyard

A tree-filled courtyard is glimpsed through the shimmering glass-brick facade of this house in Hiroshima, developed by Japanese architect Hiroshi Nakamura. Larger edition + story »

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