Van Eijk & Van Der Lubbe’s Mirrored Concept Car Provides “unobstructed Views” From Inside

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Dutch Design Week 2015: design and style duo Niels van Eijk and Miriam van der Lubbe have designed a concept automobile made from reflective cuboids, as element of a series exploring the future of vehicles for Swedish organization Volvo.

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015

Van Eijk &amp Van der Lubbe described the mysterious Outward-Looking motor vehicle as “a car that will spark some debate – and your curiosity, also”.

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015

Lacking any wheels, or other standard automobile parts, the motor vehicle is composed of three rectangular prisms with mirrored surfaces, positioned at different angles on prime of one particular an additional.

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015

“You don’t see any engine, you don’t see the way it truly is currently being moved or driven because wheels have been there for a extended time,” van der Lubbe told Dezeen. “If you believe about new contexts for transport mechanisms, then that will alter totally.”

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015

“It really is an imaginary way of driving,” she additional.


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Apparently designed for a long term when the focus of passengers will shift from the automobile to the environment, the car’s mirrored exterior makes it possible for drivers to survey passing scenery, without being observed themselves.

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015 An optical zooming device is integrated with the automobile, which comprises of two separate plastic eyepieces on stems

“The vehicle has turn into an object that suggests architecture,” the pair stated in a statement. “Simply because its skin is made of one-way-mirror material, the automobile no longer claims attention for itself, but displays the outside world.”

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015

A little opening in the middle cube allows passengers to enter the car’s stepped interior, which has various ranges for either sitting, standing, or lying. Evening-time renders of the automobile present how inner lights can reveal hidden windows to these outdoors.

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015 An additional accessory that is incorporated with the vehicle is a mirrored storage box

“The spacious interior supplies an unobstructed view in all directions and from all positions,” the duo commented.

Volvo concept car by Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe for Dutch Design Week 2015 The automobile also holds a blanket for spontaneous picnicking

“The globe has modified also: noise barriers and motorway lighting have grow to be superfluous and have disappeared. Everything in the layout encourages greatest perception of all this,” they added.


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The pair also created numerous accessories for the automobile, to “stimulate and enrich the viewing experience en route”.

Car seat by Lilian van Daal for Dutch Design Week 2015 Lilian van Daal’s winning Shapes of Sweden’s automobile seat

These contain an optical zooming device comprising two separate plastic eyepieces on stems, and a mirrored storage box designed to “re-set up the time-honoured past time of beachcombing”.

A light within the box can display objects that have been collected, and the auto also holds a blanket for spontaneous countryside picnicking.

Car seat by Lilian van Daal for Dutch Design Week 2015 The 3D-printed auto seat is made utilizing Swedish pine and resin

The style is on show at the Klokgebouw developing in Eindhoven as part of Dutch Layout Week, from 17 to 25 October 2015, alongside leather-clad and driverless material cars that the pair developed as part of Experience in Motion – a series of notion automobiles exploring how developments in technology may well influence auto layout.

The exhibition also functions perform submitted for the yearly Volvo Style Challenge, which includes Lilian van Daal’s winning Shapes of Sweden entry – for which she experimented with making use of Swedish pine and resin to 3D-print a vehicle seat.

Photography is by Lisa Klappe.

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