Timber Sunshade Becomes A Viewing Deck For Retreat Near Saint-Tropez By Jak Studio

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A timber sunshade folds in on itself to kind a balcony for this nautical-inspired house overlooking the Mediterranean sea near Saint-Tropez, developed by London architecture workplace Jak Studio .

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

The property is situated on a sloping hilltop site in the village of Les Issambres, 22 kilometres from Saint-Tropez.

It was made by Jak Studio to offer a holiday home for a British family, and features a glazed rear facade to maximise sea views.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

“By far, the owner’s biggest desire was to celebrate the postcard view of the sea,” architect Kenan Klico informed Dezeen.

“The residence has been developed so that almost each spot positive aspects from the outlook towards the bay of Saint-Tropez.”

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

The rear facade of Villa Brash, which takes its name from the owner’s surname, has an oak brise-soleil that folds in on itself to type a balcony for the bedrooms, related to a viewing deck on a ship.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

“A nautical theme emerged throughout the design method, inspired by the nostalgia of vintage cruise ships,” explained Klico.

“We also employed oak for the sunshade since it will weather naturally to a grey colour above time, adding a softer element of unpredictability to the facade.”

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

Oak slats also wrap around windows at the western side of the house to shield the living space within from afternoon sun.

The architects also added textured ceramic tiles, reminiscent of rough dry-stone walls in the spot, although U-shaped terracotta roof tiles utilized for the house and garage have been reclaimed from the regional region.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

“The aim was to create a stunning, tranquil retreat with a modern style, which also fits in with the much more rustic Mediterranean design of surrounding houses,” stated Klico.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

The two-storey residence has its entrance and three bedrooms on the upper level, along with an open-strategy kitchen, dining area and living room, plus a fourth bedroom on the lower level.

The layout was made to lead site visitors to the see slowly as they arrive through a series of half ranges.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

The blank facade at the best opens up to a five-metre-tall expanse of glazing at the rear when inside, quickly showing off the view on coming into.

Stairs then lead down to the living space on the reduce degree, and then the kitchen and poolside terrace a half level reduce, and lastly to the backyard at the bottom of the sloping website.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

“Sequencing was crucial for this property,” stated Klico. “Right after the first surprise of the view, the gradual descent directs people to slowly learn all elements of this property and its area.”


Connected story: Chestnuts Property in France features a courtyard room and a personal art gallery


A similar approach of contrasting blank entrances with dramatic views also attributes in other not too long ago completed seaside homes, like a Californian residence overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge and a Chilean residence that sprawls in 3 directions to catch the ideal views.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

To make the indoor and outside room come to feel far more linked, the architects employed the exact same components in the double-height living area as they utilised outside, which includes oak to line the walls and stone-effect ceramic tiles for the flooring.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

“The largest challenge in terms of design and style and execution was to create a fine balance in between the interior and exterior space,” Klico explained. “Crossing between the two had to truly feel seamless.”

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

The oak-lined walls have been also added to reinforce the home’s nautical theme, which is continued upstairs exactly where bedrooms have been conceived as cabins, with every opening up to the balcony.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

The bedrooms are accessed by a corridor with a rooflight operating along its length to carry far more light into the northern side of the property.

“The rooflight was designed to act like a ‘building clock’ to support the owners tell the time all through the day, and can also be utilized to provide cross-ventilation through the house,” explained Klico.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

An infinity pool at the back of the house delivers eye-level views of the horizon although swimming.

Villa Brash by Jak Studio

“Nature was the driver behind the style of this villa,” mentioned Klico. “The perform on light during the day, and how it connects with its setting, are the correct embellishments here.”

Photography is by Nick Kane.

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