Thick wooden ribs frame this extension to a household home in west London by architecture studio Tate Harmer .

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

The Dalston-primarily based architects were first tasked with overhauling the interior of the Edwardian-design house, which is found inside of a conservation region in Shepherds Bush. But they were also asked to extend a small kitchen at the rear of the house to generate a a lot more generous dining region.

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

Rather than continuing the brickwork of the unique house – like current London extensions by Fraher Architects and Cousins and Cousins – timber was chosen as the major developing materials for the extension. It supplies the framework for the walls and roof, and surrounds windows, doors and skylights.

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

“The consumer couple wished a contemporary extension, but wished one thing warm and normal, not clinical,” explained Tate Harmer’s Jonathan Turney.

“As a single of the pair is a backyard designer, we looked to develop the extension so that it connected the home and the garden, a present day greenhouse if you will.”

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

Glue-laminated timber – an engineered wood strengthened by moisture-resistant adhesives – was selected for the six thick ribs that frame the new space. They extend up 1 side wall, then fold twice just before stretching across the complete width of the ceiling.

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

According to Turney, the “semi-arched profile” producing by introducing the 45-degree angle also aided them to overcome a arranging hurdle.


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“Planning stipulated that on the shared boundary we had to limit the extension to two metres higher,” he told Dezeen. “The cranked glulam enabled us to minimise the structural intervention in this spot, retaining head height in the extension as properly as meeting the arranging suggestions.”

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

Bookshelves are slotted into the spaces amongst the ribs, as are skylights, which have been added along the angled strip between the walls and the ceiling.

“The inner timber gives a natural feel, imitating tree cover, with the roof lights bringing light deep into the plan,” added Turney.

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

The rest of the room is framed by a staggered wall of windows, making an L-shaped floor prepare with a sheltered patio in one corner.

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

An underfloor heating technique is installed beneath a floor of engineered hardwood, which is noticeably paler in tone than the exposed glulam beams. By contrast, wooden frames that surround the glass doors and windows are stained dark to make them stand out.

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

A wooden desk marks the boundary among the dining location and the kitchen at the back. Here, a mixture of dark grey and red cabinets add extra tones to the area, even though the surrounding walls are painted brilliant white so as not to make the room appear too active.

Timber exoskeleton house by Tate Harmer

Tate Harmer, formerly recognized as Jerry Tate Architects, is led by Tate and company partner Rory Harmer. Other projects by the architects consist of a treehouse inspired by a bird’s nest and a efficiency venue at the entrance to London’s Thames Tunnel.

Photography is by Kilian O’Sullivan.

Timber-exoskeleton-house-extension_Tate-Harmer_dezeen_1Floor strategy Timber-exoskeleton-house-extension_Tate-Harmer_dezeen_2Lengthy section Timber-exoskeleton-house-extension_Tate-Harmer_dezeen_3Cross area

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