Japan’s “toilet Of The Year” By Klein Dytham Architecture Seems To Offer No Privacy

0
1582

Men and women seem to be dancing, jumping and skating behind the seemingly translucent facade of this public restroom, which has just been named Japanese Toilet of the Year (+ film).

Designed by Tokyo-primarily based Klein Dytham Architecture, Gallery TOTO is a public toilet within Narita Airport, despite the fact that it also functions as a showroom for Japanese bathroom brand TOTO.

It was recently awarded as greatest toilet in Japan by the ministry of land, infrastructure and transportation.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

From the outside, the facility appears to have translucent walls that reveal the silhouettes of the toilet end users behind.

But these are in fact LED screens, enjoying prerecorded sequences that include dance events and cleaning.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

“We have been interested in the notion of the most private spot becoming in a most public location,” explained architect and studio co-founder Mark Dytham, whose past projects incorporate offices for Google and YouTube.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

“We wanted to get away from the perception of toilets as closed and dark environments, where one can seldom see past the entrance area, and in which 1 is only confronted with a series of terraced stalls,” he advised Dezeen.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

The whole block is encased in clear glass and houses ten individual toilet cubicles.


Associated story: Dezeen’s top 10: toilets


Behind the glass, 6 of the cubicles are fronted by 1 or two low-resolution LED panels, masked by material screens.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

When movies are played on the screens, it creates the illusion that toilet occupants are on present to absolutely everyone else in the airport terminal, when in reality they have total privacy.

The effect is similar to the view by means of a standard Japanese room divider.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

“When not illuminated the wall looks just like a textile and is quite soft, like a shoji display,” said Dytham.

“An LED panel would have given a challenging, sharp image, but right here the minimal-resolution digital image and tactile fabric provide an image that seems more like a soft shadow.”

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

The architects worked with creative agency Black Bass and contemporary dance business Unusual Kinoko to choreograph the 20-minute overall performance of “silhouetted happenings” in the toilets.

The sequence also consists of images of moving water and splattered paint.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

Every toilet is also fitted with an LED indicator strip displaying how prolonged the cubicle has been in use for, so that people waiting can see which one is likely to become free next. “The indicator is like a thermometer that can be witnessed from both side,” mentioned Dytham.

Inside, every cubicle is decorated with images of landscapes.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein Dytham

Gallery TOTO is found in the Sky Lounge, which connects Narita Terminal 2 to its satellite terminal. It types portion of a series of upgrades underway at the airport in preparation for the 2020 Olympic Video games.

Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein DythamSky Lounge strategy – click for greater image Gallery TOTO at Narita Airport by Klein DythamGallery TOTO plan – click for greater image


Connected story: Hiroshima Park Restrooms by Potential Studio

Hiroshima Park Restrooms by Future Studios

This colourful series of public toilets recently finished by Japanese architects Future Studio in Hiroshima have been designed to resemble origami cranes. Much more »

Related movie: “There is a extremely robust future for books” – Mark Dytham on Daikanyama T-Site

Architect Mark Dytham of Klein Dytham Architecture talks to Dezeen editor-in-chief Marcus Fairs about the long term of books in the digital age in this movie we filmed at the Planet Architecture Festival 2012, in which a bookstore he created in Japan won the prize in the buying centres class. More substantial edition + story »

Far more toilet design:

Pin it |

Dezeen

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here