Bricks, Doors And Roof Tiles Recycled By Phooey Architects For Melbourne House Extension

0
1920

The walls of this extension to a residence in Melbourne attribute a mismatched pattern of bricks and roof slates, sourced when component of the original constructing was demolished .

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Developed by Melbourne-primarily based Phooey Architects, Cubo Residence is a new two-storey rear extension and basement for a couple with two young young children.

It offers far more room for household and going to buddies, but also improves a cluttered current layout.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

The clientele requested that recycled resources be utilised wherever achievable, following in the footsteps of other Australian buildings – such as a warehouse-like residence built from second-hand bricks and a cafe with wall panels made from previous doors.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

“They had been committed to sustainability, which includes the adaptation and reuse of artefacts that could not be retained in the course of the demolition and construction,” told Dezeen.

“It displays that new additions to old buildings can be a delightful combine of new, previous, and someplace in-in between.”

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Square sections of the demolished bricks were laid in alternating instructions, inspired by the Surrealist collage technique of cubomania, which concerned cutting photos into cubes and rearranging them randomly.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

“Demolition drawings of the present rear facade were lower up into equal squares and rearranged in a Surrealist cubomania manner,” explained the architects.

“Collectively with the owners, this mish-mash of squares was then tinkered with in excess of time as the undertaking evolved to make the ultimate pattern.”

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Other discarded aspects of the home have been also reused, such as metal security doors for the awning about the rear window and roof slates for the windowsills, as properly as some sections of the rear facade.


Connected story: Triangular void connects a two-storey timber extension to a Melbourne bungalow


“In addition to the environmental rewards, we are entertained by the chance to upcycle banal and discarded waste into desirable and purposeful additions, to celebrate the memory of the present developing,” said the team.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

The extension adds approximately 100 square metres to the two-storey residence, growing its size by half. On the ground floor there is a new open-program kitchen and dining region at the back, plus a laundry area and powder area, and on the first floor there are two new bedrooms and a bathroom. A children’s playroom, storage, and a guest bedroom with an en-suite bathroom had been also added in the new basement.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

In the centre of the residence, walls and floors have been removed to generate a triple-height stairwell that connects all ranges, stretching almost 11 metres from prime to bottom.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

“Originally, you entered the property by means of a dark, stuffy corridor underneath the staircase,” stated the architects. “In its place, the new welcoming entry foyer now opens up to a sun-drenched multi-level void with organic ventilation.”

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Old windows that were discarded from the refurbishment had been reused to develop a feature wall on one side of the stairs, which encounter a lightwell, and the outdated steps and balustrade had been reused to create a chandelier in the centre.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Landings on all 3 levels were created as generous, multi-practical spaces.

“They are large sufficient to provide actual space functions, providing flexible, effectively-lit, ventilated spaces to work, perform or just hang out,” said the architects.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Leftover stair balustrades have been also reused as cabinet handles in the kitchen.

Polished, exposed aggregate concrete was utilised for the flooring, which extends outside past a wall of steel-framed glazing to make the indoor and outside spaces feel much more like one particular.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

“Melbourne is both stiflingly hot or bitterly cold for considerably of the 12 months, so it truly is ideal to have interiors that can be fully enclosed, but still connect strongly with the garden,” stated the architects.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Outdoors, benches and a barbecue region are covered in reclaimed hardwood boards, which are laid in alternating directions, similar to the bricks.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

“The very same reduce-up strategy guided the design for new elements, with salvaged timber flooring reduce up in a square grid to become internal and external joinery specifics,” explained the architects.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

The fifty five-square-metre garden was developed in collaboration with Simon Ellis Landscape Architects, and attributes a bike shed at the back, plus a patch for growing strawberries, vegetables and herbs.

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

“It is a tiny, child-pleasant backyard filled with as numerous exciting and sustainable characteristics as a massive garden,” said the architects.

“It has a diversity of materials, strategically interwoven to allow perform, enjoyable, tranquility, and a versatile transition among within and outdoors.”

Cubo House by Phooey Architects

Photovoltaic cells and solar thermal panels are concealed on the roof of the rear extension to offer sizzling water and electricity for the household.

Tanks are installed underground to keep rainwater, which is captured and utilized to flush toilets and water the garden.

Photography is by Peter Bennetts.


Project credits:

Layout Crew: Emma Younger, Peter Ho, Adam Gordon, Jessie Cook, Rob Chittleborough, Helen Duong, Anne-Claire Deville and Lucinda Arundel
Structural Engineer: Perrett Simpson Stantin
Landscape Architect: Simon Ellis Landscape Architects
Builder: Conterno Group

Cubo House by Phooey ArchitectsFloor programs Cubo House by Phooey ArchitectsSections Dezeen

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here